Excerpts from the Annual Report of the Lighthouse Board for 1902


Excerpts from the "Annual Report of the Light-House Board for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1902"


1902

Third District

TEMPORARY CHANGES IN AIDS TO NAVIGATION.

Sandy Hook Light-vessel, entrance to New York Lower Bay, New York.-- Light-vessel No. 51 withdrawn for repairs and station marked by relief light-vessel No. 16 July 30; light vessel No. 51 replaced on station and relief light-vessel No. 16 withdrawn October 15, 1901.

Northeast End light-vessel, off the seacoast of New Jersey.--Light-vessel No. 44 withdrawn for repairs and station marked by relief light-vessel No. 11, August 24; light-vessel No. 44 replaced on station and relief light-vessel No. 11 withdrawn October 3, 1901.

Goose Island Flat gas buoy, No. 26, Delaware River, New Jersey.--Extinguished September 10; relighted September 11, 1901.

Barnegat Shoal bell buoy, seacoast of New Jersey.--Not sounding September 23; repaired the same day.

Five Fathom Bank light-vessel, off the entrance to Delaware Bay, New Jersey.--Light-vessel No. 40 withdrawn for repairs and station marked by relief light-vessel No. 11 October 4; light-vessel No. 40 replaced on station and relief light-vessel No. 11 withdrawn November 16, 1901

Seventeen-Foot Knoll gas buoy, Delaware River, New Jersey.--Light extinguished October 7, 1901; relighted the same day; extinguished November 7, 1901; and relighted the same day; extinguished January 13; relighted the same day; adrift in the ice January 15; removed January 16, 1902.

United States Dike beacon light, No. 3, Sandy Hook Bay, New Jersey.--Structure carried away by ice and light extinguished April 11; rebuilt and light reestablished April 22, 1902.


THIRD DISTRICT

This district extends from Elisha Ledge, off Warren Point, Rhode Island, to a point on the coast of New Jersey, opposite Shrewsbury Rocks, and includes the ledge and the rocks. It embraces all aids to navigation on the coast of Rhode Island, Connecticut and New York, and of New Jersey northward of the point opposite Shrewsbury Rocks, and on all tidal waters tributary to the sea or Long Island sound between the limits named, together with the aids on Whitehall Narrows and on the United States waters of Lake Champlain and Memphremagog.

It now includes the light-house service of Porto Rico, and the adjacent islands, and the waters of the islands lying east of the seventy-fourth meridian of longitude west of Greenwich, which were ceded to the United States by the Government of Spain by treaty entered into on December 10, 1898.

Inspector.---Capt. Wiliam M. Folger, United States Navy.
Engineer.---Lieut. Co. David Porter Heap, Corps of Engineers, United States Army , to September 17, 1901; Maj. William T. Rossell, Corp. of Engineers, United States Army, from September 7, 1901.

There are in this district---

Lighthouses and beacon lights, including 101 post lights 283
Light-houses in Porto Rico 15
Light-vessels in position 7
Light-vessels for relief 4
Day or unlighted beacons 45
Fog-signals operated by caloric or oil engines 31
Fog-signals operated by clockwork 55
Electric-lighted buoys 11
Gas-lighted buoys 13
Whistling buoys in position 8
Bell buoys in position 32
Other buoys in position 642
Steamer Armeria, used for supplying the light-stations of the Atlantic and Bulf coasts 1
Steamers John Rogers and Cactus, buoy tenders, and for supply and inspection of light-stations. 2
Steamer Gardenia, buoy tender and for freight 1
Steamers Misteltoe and Iris, used for works of constructions and repair of light-stations, fog-signals, and day beacons. 2
Steam launch Nettle, for works of constructions and repair on Lake Champlain 1
Steam launch Daisy 1

LIGHT-STATIONS


376. Sandy Hook (rear) range, New Jersey.--A reservation fence and material for cistern cover were delivered.
379. Sandy Hook fog bell, New York.--A protective sheathing was built around the foundation of the tower. The location of the bell was changed 800 feet to the westward, to a point 3,130 feet W. 3/8 N. from the North Hook Beacon, on November 30, 1901. The plant for a 32-candlepower electric light, to be operated from the electric buoy station, was installed, and the light will soon be established. The work of moving and establishing the bell tower in its new location was completed. The fog-bell striking machine was installed, and a platform with ladders on the top of the tower was put up to show the red light.
381. Waackaack, New Jersey.--On September 23, 1901, the keeper was authorized to take down the old abandoned tower, without expense to the Government, and to use the old lumber for firewood. The tower was taken down as authorized. Various repairs were made.
The following recommendation, made in the Board's last two annual reports, is renewed:

The present quarters for the light-keepers are inadequate. Recommendation was made in annual reports of 1896, 1897, 1898, and 1899, that either an addition to the old dwellling or new quarters be built. The Board is now of opinion that new quarters should be provided. It is estimated that this can be done for not exceeding $3,500, and it is recommended that an appropriation of this amount be made therefor.

--. Liberty enlightening the World, New York.-- the light was extinguished March 1, 1902, and the station was transferred to the War Department. Various repairs had been made during the year and prior to the transfer.
402 to 410. Shrewsbury River beacons, New Jersey.--A brick oil house was built.
402. United States Dike beacon, No. 1.--A brick oil house was built.
403. United States Dike beacon No. 3.--A brick oil house was built.
404. Lower Rocky Point beacon, No. 2. --the beacon was rebuilt and reestablished on May 5, 1902.
406. Northwest Point beacon light, No. 2 A.--Lanterns with equipments were delivered, and the light was established on May 5, 1902.
408. Goose Neck Point beacon light, no. 11, New Jersey.--Lanterns with all equipments were delivered, and the light was established on May 5, 1902.
409. Cooks Sedges beacon light, No. 13, New Jersey.--this beacon was completed on May 5 and was established on May 20, 1902.

LIGHT-VESSELS.

364. Sandy Hook light-vessel, No. 51, off the entrance to New York Bay, New York.--This steel steam self-propelling light-vessel was built in 1892, and is of 283 tons gross burden. Her light is electric, fixed white, with eclipses, and her fog-signal is a 10-inch steam whistle. She was off her station for repairs from April 30 to October 15, 1901, when she was replaced and light-vessel No. 16 was withdrawn. Her bottom was painted and the deck repaired around the stern; also under topgallant forecastle, and the aft side of the rudder received a new arm. She received rudder chains, tubes for her boilers, a smokestack, bolts in the fron tof both boilers, and a few small repairs tothe engine. She received fire felt, packing, cement, lighting arrestors, stove linings, grates, cooking utensils, grate bars, rope, halyards, canvas, ensigns, oil, paints, soap, and a whaleboat.
366. Scotland light-vessel, No. 7, off Sandy Hook entrance to New York, New York.--This wooden light-vessel was built in 1854, is of 142 tons gross burden, shows two fixed red lights, and has a bell fog-signal. She received hose, couplings, brick and grate, cooking utensils, oil, piant, rope, matresses, a whaleboat, and her lamps were repaired.
--. Relief light-vessel, No. 11.--This wooden vessel was built in 1853. Her gross burden is 320 tons and her fog-signal is a bell. She was not required for duty during the year.
--Relief light-vessel, No. 16.--This wooden vessel was built in 1854, is of 250 tons gross burden, and has a steam fog-signal. She is kept at the general light-house depot in readiness to relieve, when required, either light-vessel No. 51, stationed off Sandy Hook, or light vessel No. 68, off Fire Island, both of which vessels she resembles in having a smokestack and fog-signal between masts. On July 30, 1901, she relieved Sandy Hook light-vessel, No. 51, which was brought in for repairs, and she was withdrawn October 15, 1901, when light-vessel No. 51 was returned to her station. She received linoleum, clock, wick, chimneys, paint, hemp, rope, and a new stem for her safety valve.

FOURTH DISTRICT

This district extends from a point on the coast of New Jersey opposite Shrewsbury Rocks (but does not include the rocks) to and includes Metokin Inlet, Virginia. It embraces all aids to navigation on the seacoast of NewJersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, and the tidal waters tributary to the sea between the rocks and the inlet.
Inspector.--Commander John Hubbard, United States Navy.
Engineer.--Lieut. Col. William A. Jones, Corps of Engineers, United States Army.
In this district there are--

Light-houses and beacon lights, including 5 post lights 69
Light-vessels in position 5
Day or unlighted beacon 3
Fog-signals operated by steam, caloric, or oil engines 8
Fog-signals operated by clockwork 7
Gas-lighted buoys in position 5
Whistling buoys in position 4
Bell buoys in position 8
Ice buoys in position 40
Other buoys in position 152
Steamer Zizania, buoy tender, and for supply and inspection 1
Naphtha launch Leal, used for works of construction and repair 1

LIGHT STATIONS

Some 261 inspections of vessels, stations, and post lights were made during the year, and without exception the stations were found to be in an efficient condition and the keepers generally attentive to their duties. Frequent inspections of the buoys were made.

472. Absecon, Atlantic City, seacoast of New Jersey. -- Plans and specifications were prepared for erecting an addition to and remodeling this dwelling and bids for doing the work were asked by advertisement. There being no further use for the cistern under keeper's dwelling No. 3, the station now being supplied with city water, it was remodeled so as to form a cellar. A low barbed-wire fence was built along the Rhode Island avenue, Pacific avenue, and Vermont avenue sides of the light-house site. The boundary lines of the part set aside for the use of the Weather Bureau were fenced. About 200 trees, shrubs, and plants were frunished for improvement of the grounds. Three galvanized-iron kerosene tanks 24 inches in diameter and 5 feet high were placed in the oil house. Various repairs were made.
477. Cape May, seacoast of New Jersey. -- The work of erecting an additional dwelling here, by contract, was begun and contract was made for furnishing this dwelling with a steam-heating apparatus. A telephone and call-bell system were installed, connecting the watchroom of the tower with three bedrooms in the keeper's quarters. Various repairs were made.
487. Brandywine Shoal, Delaware Bay, Delaware. -- The construction of the new trumpet fog-signal house and the installation of the oil engine, air compressor, operating machinery, etc., was completed. A galvanized-iron oil house was erected.
488. Fourteen Foot Bank, Delaware Bay, Delaware. -- The erection of a boat landing was commenced. New davit bases and guide rods were made. Various repairs were made.
494-495. Maurice River Range, Delaware Bay, New Jersey. -- An elevated board walk was built extending from oil house to the rear lantern post, a distance of about 1,100 feet. Various repairs were made.
496. Egg Island, Delaware Bay, New Jersey. -- Plans for the construction of the light-house were begun. Contract was made for erecting an iron oil house.
500. Ship John Shoal, Delaware Bay, New Jersey. -- A counterbalanced boat-landing ladder was made and delivered.
511. Finns Point Front, Delaware River, New Jersey. -- The act approved on June 28, 1902, appropriated $30,000, in addition to that appropriated by the act approved on March 3, 1901, for reestablishing this and the Port Penn and Reedy Island ranges on new sites, and the site was bought. Various repairs were made.
512. Finns Point Rear, Delaware River, New Jersey. -- The act approved on June 28, 1902, appropriated $30,000, in addition to that appropriated by the act approved on March 3, 1901, for reestablishing this and the Port Penn and Reedy Island ranges on new sites, and the purchase of a site, with rights of way, etc., was made.
517. Deep Water Point Rear, Delaware River, New Jersey. -- Brick walks were laid from the entrance of the dwelling to the drive and oil house. Part of the shell road was rebuilt and a revetment for its protection was made at the entrance to the site, where it was being washed away. A fence was built along the east side of the barn. Some ornamental plants were furnished. Various repairs were made.
527. Tinicum Island Rear, Delaware River, New Jersey. -- Permission was obtained and 17 young popular trees in Lincoln Park which obstructed the view of the light along the range were cut back from 55 [kmr note - can't be sure of the height, it is not clear on my copy] to 35 feet. A complete survey was made, locating the trees along the range between the station and the Billingsport Front light, and a map was plotted. About 100 Norway spruces and some other ornamental plants were furnished and set out. Various minor repairs were made.
528. Fort Mifflin Bar Cut Rear, Delaware River, New Jersey. -- An addition was made to the dwelling containing a kitchen and a bedroom. The erection of the new day mark on the tower was completed, and thre disk and frame were painted. The cross fence was rebuilt and some ornamental plants were furnished for use on the grounds. Various repairs were made.

REPAIRS

Repairs more or less extensive were made at the following-named light-stations:

469. Sea Girt, seacoast of N.J.
470. Barnegat, seacoast of N.J.
471. Tucker Beach, seacoast of N.J.
473. Ludlum Beach, seacoast of N.J.
474. Hereford Inlet, seacoast of N.J.
493. Maurice River, Delaware Bay, N.J.
497. Cross Ledge, Delaware Bay, N.J.
516. Deep Water Point Front, Delaware River, N.J.
526. Billingsport Front, Delaware River, N.J.
529. Fort Mifflin fog-signal station, Delaware River, Pa.
533-534-535. Horseshoe Range, East Group, Delaware River, N.J.

LIGHT-VESSELS

475. Northeast End light-vessel, No. 44, off the seacoast of New Jersey. -- This iron light-vessel was built in 1881-82, and is of 304 tons gross burden, and has a steam fog-signal. She was temporarily withdrawn from her station for repairs on August 24, 1901, and the station was marked by relief light-vessel No. 11. She was taken to Wilmington, Del., where she was docked and her bottom was cleaned and painted with two coats of antifouling paint. She received 2 wooden fenders, a new hawse pipe for the mooring chain, 3 bucket racks, new top to the gallery skylight, 104 2 1/2-inch boiler tubes, new coupling and nipple to the bilge ejector, her blow-off pipe was repaired, the sea valves were overhauled, and a new connection was made from the water heater to the boilers. Provisions, fuel, winch handle, grate bars, wire rope, dishes, lantern chain, wire, boat sail, etc., were supplied. She was returned to her station on October 3, 1901, and relief light-vessel No. 11 was withdrawn.
476. Five-Fathom Bank light-vessel, No. 40, off seacoast of New Jersey. -- This wooden light-vessel was built in 1875, is of 350 tons gross burden, and has a steam fog-signal. She was temporarily withdrawn from her station for repairs on October 4, 1901, and the station was marked by relief light-vessel No. 11. She was brought to Philadelphia, where she received new hawse pipe for he mooring chain, a new bilge pump, shutters to the lantern houses, floor in the forward lantern house, her rigging and stays were lifted and re-served, the outside planking above the main rail was renewed, new block and handles for deck pump, the hoisting gear for lantern was overhauled, new pins were fitted in the sheaves, new water collars, and the like. She also received 52 2 1/2-inch tubes on each boiler, new steam pipes from the steam drum to the fog-signal machinery and pumps; the feed pump was overhauled, new flanges were put on the boiler feed pipe, and new cage work work was put around the whistle. She was returned to her station, off the entrance to Delaware Bay, on November 16, 1901, and relief light-vessel No. 11 was withdrawn. Provisions, fuel, davit blocks, 100 feet 1 1/2-inch hose, medicine, rope, lumber, dishes, plate glass for lanterns, glands, packing, etc., were supplied.

The light-vessel No. 40, now on this station, has been about twenty-seven years in service. Her decks, upper works, bitts, windlass, catheads, bulkheads, and many of her deck beams and carlins are in such condition that they can not last with safety more than a couple of years, if that long, without renewing, and her under-water body is in fair condition only. in heavy weather she leaks so badly as to be exceedingly uncomfortable to the crew, as well as to enforce much extra labor in pumping and cleaning. The extent of repairs that would be required to put her in good condition amounts practically to rebuilding, and this would only be a makeshift--new upper works and decks on an old wooden bottom. It will take two years from this date, if the proper measures are immediately taken to obtain the necessary Congressional action to build the vessel--to get her onto her station. It is estimated that a suitable light-vessel for this station could be built for $90,000, and the Board recommends that an appropriation of that amount be made therefor.

FOG SIGNALS OPERATED BY STEAM, HOT AIR, OR OIL ENGINES

475. Northeast End light-vessel, No. 44, New Jersey. -- The 12-inch steam whistle was in operation some 396 hours, and consumed about 20 tons of coal.
476. Five-Fathom Bank light-vessel, No. 40, New Jersey. -- The 12-inch steam whistle was in operation some 400 hours, and consumed about 23 1/2 tons of coal.
487. Brandywine Shoal, Delaware Bay, Delaware. -- the second class Daboll trumpet, operated by an oil engine, recently established at this station, was not in operation during the fiscal year.
488. Fourteen Foot Bank, Delaware Bay, Delaware.-- The second class Daboll trumpet, operated by a hot-air engine, was in operation some 321 hours, and sonsumed about 1 1/2 tons of coal.

BUOYAGE.

There were maintained last year on the seacoast from Squan Inlet, New Jersey, to Chincoteague Inlet, Virginia, 27 buoys; in Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey, 16 buoys, in Little Egg Harbor Inlet, New Jersey, 6 buoys; in Absecon Inlet, New Jersey 5 buoys; in Great Egg Harbor Inlet and River, New Jersey, 13 buoys; in Townsend Inlet, New Jersey, 3 buoys; in Hereford Inlet, New Jersey, 5 buoys; in Delaware Bay and River and Schuylkill River, 126 buoys. A horizontal striped second-class can buoy was placed to mark the wreck of the steamer Ranald, off Atlantic City, N. J.; 6 additional perpendicular striped buoys were placed in Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey; 1 perpendicular striped third-class can was placed in Great Egg Harbor Inlet, New Jersey. Buoys were discontinued as follows: A nun marking a wreck in Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey; a nun in Little Egg Harbor Inlet, New Jersey.

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